Shrimp Mozambique

I have Janet to thank for tonight’s dinner.  She pointed me to a site called Food Gawker which pointed me to a recipe on a site called Savoring the Thyme.  That recipe, along with a charming story, was for Shrimp Mozambique. A few ingredients and less than 30 minutes of your time and you have a dinner that only needs 2 things:  another beer and a bigger bowl.

No substitutions tonight.  The recipe calls for pretty standard ingredients except for one.  It calls for Goya con Afrazan.  I have zero familiarity with this spice combination so I couldn’t very well make a credible substitution.  You may be familiar, as was I,  with Goya’s Sazon with Coriander and Annatto.  That is available is every grocery store I go to.  The Sazon con Afrazan is not.  I had to go to a Latin market for that.  And thank goodness.  It’s a yummy spice and at the Latin market it was about half the price of the other Goya seasoning that I get at Kroger.  I’ll be going there again!

A few thoughts.  I think this would be just as good served with crusty bread instead of over rice.  Also, if any of you have shellfish allergies or avoid shrimp for another reason I think a very mild, but firm white fish might do as well.  It’s definitely worth a shot.  In my world there can’t be much wrong with a recipe that has beer, butter and shrimp in it.  I did add a pinch of salt.  A squeeze of lime would be lovely too, but not critical. 

I did make a few adjustments to the recipe to make it a little more clear.  First, the recipe allows for leaving the shell on the shrimp; leaving the tail on the shrimp; or peeling them completely.  If you know me then you know how I feel about having to manage shrimp shells or tails in food that is served with utensils.  Unless you’re planning to be up to your elbows in this dish peel the shrimp all the way.  I also cut mine in half before cooking.  If you don’t them you’re likely to slosh broth all over yourself cutting them in the bowl.  Also, the original calls for you to cook the shrimp 3 minutes on one side and 3 minutes on the other.  Since I cut the shrimp in half  there was no flipping them.  And six minutes would have been far too long to cook them.  Three minutes and a stir was plenty.

In my quest to limit my leftovers this week I only made half the recipe.  I think that’s probably good.  Shrimp don’t always reheat that well.  Besides, this recipe is easy enough and quick enough that you should make it fresh everytime.

Good? Oh, yes, very good.
Easy? Yep.
Good for company? Recipes like this make having dinner guests during the week possible.
Special shopping? Yes. Check your local Latin market for the Sazon con Afrazan.

Shrimp Mozambique

Ingredients

1 pound of 24-30 size shrimp, raw (fresh or frozen)
1 medium to large sweet onion, finely chopped
4 large cloves of garlic, minced
3 Tablespoons fresh parsley, finely chopped
2 packets of Goya Azafran
1 can of light beer
1/4 Cup olive oil
1/2 stick of unsalted butter
salt and ground pepper
1-2 teaspoons dried or wet red pepper, optional
Cooked rice

Directions

1. Peel and devein the shrimp. Cut them in half crossways.
2. Prepare the onion, garlic, parsley, azafran (and red pepper if you want some more ‘heat’) and place all in small bowl and set aside.

3. Melt the butter and oil over medium to medium-high heat in a large pan or wok. And the onion and cook for 4-5 minutes. Lower the heat to medium and add the ingredients from the small bowl and cook for 3 minutes.

4. Pour the beer into the pan, cover and cook for 4-5 minutes. Add the shrimp, cover and cook for 3 minutes

5. Serve immediately over rice or with crusty bread.

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